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Erica Hunzinger

Erica Hunzinger is the editor of Harvest Public Media, based at KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri.

Born and bred in central Illinois, Erica branched out to the University of Missouri-Columbia for her journalism degree and later earned an MA in Humanities (with an emphasis on poetry) from the University of Chicago.

Previously, Erica was the politics, education and criminal justice editor at St. Louis Public Radio. For five years before that, she was a member of The Associated Press' Central Region editing desk, where she took a keen interest in working on regional agriculture stories. Erica also spent time on copy-editing desks at The News Journal in Wilmington, Delaware, and The News & Observer in Raleigh, North Carolina.

She's a farmer's granddaughter, quite familiar with the smell of cow manure and processed soybeans, and tries to nurture flowers and plants in her spare time.

The United States and Mexico announced this week there’s a tentative deal in their renegotiation of the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA.

A new book, "Eating NAFTA: Trade, Food Policies and the Destruction of Mexico," looks at the connections between the agricultural and food trade policies that the policy has brought about.

Updated June 1, 2018, with bill signed — Missouri is in the vanguard when it comes to defining what meat is.

It’s an essential, perhaps even existential, question sparked by the growth of plant-based proteins,meat substitutes and lab-grown products. And it’s a topic that, while first passed at the state level Thursday, is also being considered at the federal level.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the biggest federal program aimed at breaking the cycle of poverty that millions of Americans find themselves in — sometimes for a few months, sometimes for several years.

U.S. REP. ROGER MARSHALL'S OFFICE

Held up over disagreements over federal food stamps, the first draft of the 2018 farm bill arrived Thursday, bearing 35 changes to that program, including starting a national database of participants.

Big cities in the Midwest are gaining ground on the rural communities that, for many decades, have thrived on the edges of urban development.

The statistics are clear: Rural America is deeply impacted by the opioid crisis, especially farmers and farm workers. What’s not so easy is figuring out what to do about it, three national agricultural leaders said Sunday, though they all said the real onus is on local communities.