WIUM Tristates Public Radio

Hunger

As the new school year gets underway, some students are in classrooms and others are at home but one thing is now clear: all kids can get free school meals. That’s because the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which oversees the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program and the Summer Food Service Program, has extended the pandemic provisions it introduced last spring, which include eliminating the requirement that families apply for reduced-fees or free meals. 

While COVID-19 has hampered farmers this year by forcing many farmers markets and restaurants to close, usually it’s the weather that threatens crops. A practice called “gleaning” helps save crops from going to waste while feeding those in need. 

Heavy rain was causing flooding all along the Arkansas River. Before Joe Tierney knew it, water from the nearby creek was creeping forward onto his farm in Bixby, Oklahoma. He had to evacuate, leaving behind fields full of vegetables. All Tierney could do was watch the water get closer and closer, he says.

Lexington, Nebraska, is just one of the many rural communities that has long dealt with food insecurity, but the global pandemic both intensified need in the town of 11,000 residents and presented new challenges in getting people food. 

Courtesy of the Fort Madison Food Pantry

The Fort Madison Food Pantry is the new owner of the former Rashid Library Building. The food pantry has leased space in the building for several years and supporters are glad to know they are staying put.

Likely more than 100,000 Illinoisans will lose food stamps under a rule change finalized by President Donald’s Trump administration this week. 

Courtesy Kurt Rosentrater

Global hunger has no easy answer.

Food Pantry Expects More Families

Nov 1, 2012

The Fort Madison Food Pantry says it is running low on supplies, just as the need for services is expected to increase.

The kitchen table can be considered the meeting place of the family. A group in Galesburg want to expand on that idea and make the kitchen table the meeting place of the community.

The Knox Prairie Community Kitchen (KPCK) formed last year. Organizers felt there was a need to provide meals in Galesburg and to build a greater sense of community.

Cook Laura Lytle said the food need was evident one night when she noticed a KPCK diner trying to stretch his meal by setting aside a portion for another time.