WIUM Tristates Public Radio

marijuana

BREANNA DESCOUROUEZ

Adults in Illinois will be able to legally buy and use marijuana for non-medical purposes beginning January 1, 2020.  At that same time, communities will be allowed to charge a local option sales tax of up to 3% on marijuana products.

For every crop in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency carries out a rigorous set of tests to determine which pesticides are safest. How and when a pesticide is used can depend on how that crop is consumed by the average person — is it ingested, inhaled or applied topically?

It’s a precise science that aims to keep consumers safe from potentially toxic residues. But, like most federal regulations, none of it applies to the marijuana industry.      

Tuesday nights are generally pretty quiet in Macomb.  But this week was an exception as police raided a house near the Western Illinois University campus.

With growing support among politicians and the public, Illinois could likely legalize recreational marijuana as soon as next year. But, passing legislation may hinge on where the revenue will go. 

What Happens To Pot Convictions If Illinois Legalizes?

Dec 10, 2018
BREANNA DESCOUROUEZ

The push to legalize recreational marijuana in Illinois could get a jump-start early next year. State Sen. Heather Steans (D-Chicago) said she plans to introduce legislation early next year to tax and regulate the use and sale of marijuana.

BREANNA DESCOUROUEZ

A new report suggests Illinois state and local governments would take in a combined $525 million in new tax revenue if the state legalizes recreational marijuana.

Lawmakers see chance for green with recreational marijuana.

Marijuana legalization is getting another look in Illinois, particularly for the money it could bring the state. The state has overdue bills nearing $9 billion after a more than two-year budget stalemate, and some argue a little extra cash could go a long way.

A marijuana advocacy group is urging Illinois lawmakers to accept Governor Bruce Rauner's changes to a marijuana decriminalization plan.

The Illinois Senate has voted to reduce the penalties for carrying small amounts of marijuana. The legislation would make possession a ticketable offense, rather than one requiring jail time.

The sponsor, Democratic Sen. Michael Noland, says it would save the state money.

"I'm really looking forward to taking the $29 million a year that we're going to save on prosecuting these cases and actually using it for drug treatment for harder drugs," Noland said.

Flickr

Documents obtained by the Associated Press include a list of top-scoring applicants for marijuana cultivation licenses, sorted by state police district.

flickr/dankdepot

Illinois is whittling down the more than 370 applications submitted to operate medical marijuana cultivation centers and dispensaries.

Duo Arrested in Macomb for Receiving Drugs via Mail

Sep 10, 2014
TSPR's Emily Boyer

Macomb police said Trae Kirk, 21, of Aurora and Brandyn Gray, 21, of Prospect Heights had drugs mailed to them from the west coast through the U.S. Postal Service.

Salon.com

Macomb aldermen were mum about proposed zoning regulations for medical marijuana facilities.

Universities in Illinois may soon get the chance to research industrial hemp.  HB5085 is weaving it's way through the legislature.Lee Strubinger reports.

The Illinois Farm Bureau has been pushing the idea.  But hemp was banned in the 1970’s and labeled a controlled substance, as it is related to marijuana.

Curtis Bisbee / Tri States Public Radio

Some Burlington teenagers are in trouble after adding a little something extra to some cookie dough in a home economics class... Marijuana.

Illinois House Approves Marijuana Law

Apr 17, 2013
salon.com

Medical marijuana took a significant step on April 17 toward becoming law in Illinois.  For the first time, it won approval in the House.

The vote was close (61-to-57), and lawmakers were vacillating until the last minute.

People who decided to support medical marijuana said they heard from constituents who told them it's the best way they've found to relieve their pain.

But others are worried about people abusing the system.

Rich Egger

The recently approved marijuana ordinance in Galesburg has gone up in smoke.

The law would have allowed police to issue a ticket to those caught possessing up to 2.5 grams of pot. Offenders could pay a fine instead of going to court.

But Mayor Sal Garza will veto the measure and is recommending changes he feels will improve it.

The mayor wants to start an education program for those under age 18 who are caught with small amounts of marijuana. He also wants to increase the fine to cover the cost of implementing the program.