WIUM Tristates Public Radio

pandemic

SPENCER TRITT

This school year, schools identified around 420,000 fewer homeless students than last year. That would normally be a hopeful sign, but not during the pandemic. Advocates say there aren't fewer students experiencing homelessness. It's just that schools can't find them.

Public university presidents recently wrote Gov. JB Pritzker, asking him to make higher education a priority area for COVID-19 vaccinations. But with only a limited number of doses available, Pritzker said he made the decision to place higher ed staff and students in the 1C class--or at least behind K-12 students.

Iowa House Speaker Pat Grassley, R-New Hartford, did not allow a Democratic representative to speak during a debate Tuesday evening because she violated the chamber dress code by wearing jeans. She said she was testing Grassley's claims that he can't enforce a mask mandate.

I don’t know about you all, but I am beyond exhausted.  This isn't pandemic fatigue, but full on pandemic burn out.  Pandemic fatigue is being tired of wearing my mask.  Pandemic burnout is not being able to envision ever not wearing my mask.  I had hoped that by the beginning of 2021 we would have had COVID somewhat under control.  But, the new B.1.1.7 strain of the virus appears to be more contagious and at this point is moving faster than our ability to distribute vaccines.  

Rich Egger

An expert believes the economy will look different as we rebound from the pandemic-related recession, and he said some post-pandemic economic trends are already beginning to emerge.

CDC

The McDonough and Schuyler County Health Departments said they will begin administering the coronavirus vaccine on Monday, February 1, 2021.

Like other governors nationwide, Gov. JB Pritzker has recently taken to criticizing a slower-than-anticipated COVID-19 vaccination effort at Illinois’ long-term care facilities by pharmacy giants CVS and Walgreens.

Rich Egger

Some counties are releasing more information about COVID-19 vaccination schedules. And financial assistance is headed to small businesses in a couple communities.

Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Supply chain issues and logistical challenges are causing the rollout of the coronavirus vaccine in Illinois to move slower than expected. But the vaccine is now going out to older adults in some parts of the state.

Courtesy photo

Last year was rough.  And to be honest, I am not sure that this year is going to be much better.  Usually at the dawn of the new year, I feel a sense of relief.  There is a perception of having a clean slate and being able to begin again.  This year I feel none of this.  The messes of 2020 continue to follow us into 2021 in no small part because of decisions we make as individuals and as a larger society. 

Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly has examined dozens of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in St. Louis, but he still finds it jarring to see how the virus ravages their bodies.

Illinois lawmakers have not officially met for a full legislative session day since late May — more than 200 days ago.

Jeff Roberson/AP

Across Illinois, more than 80% of all ICU beds are now occupied, according to data from the state's department of public health.

Courtesy of The Wine Sellers

In response to the pandemic, many Macomb restaurants and other businesses spent money this year to create outdoor seating areas. Some of those businesses could be reimbursed for that expense.

At least 13.6 million Americans have caught the coronavirus this year — more people than the entire populations of Michigan and Iowa combined.

The U.S. is averaging about 1,500 COVID-19 deaths per day, or about one death per minute.

But the situation likely will get much worse this winter, based on new research from Washington University.

U.S. Rep. Cheri Bustos says she has recovered from COVID-19.

Commentary: Zooming Through the Semester

Nov 11, 2020

While thousands of college students around the country are gearing up to come home for winter break, I'm settling into the idea of two more months in my family's house. You heard me right. Another two months.

Sandra Martell is in a tough spot. As public health administrator in northern Illinois’ Winnebago County, Martell was threatened with lawsuits from several area bar owners after she included them on a list of businesses allegedly defying the governor’s orders to halt indoor dining.

The county is part of a region that faced tougher restrictions this month after the rate of positive COVID-19 tests rose above 8%.

A group of Springfield bars and restaurant owners say they’re taking legal action and refusing to follow new rules imposed by the governor shuttering indoor service after the west-central Illinois region saw a sustained rise in COVID-19 test positivity rates, triggering the restrictions.

A screenshot from a video feed provided by the state of Illinois

During a visit to Champaign on Tuesday, Governor J.B. Pritzker announced the creation of two new manufacturing training academies in downstate Illinois.

High school basketball in Illinois along with hockey and wrestling won't take place as scheduled as the state struggles against a resurgence of COVID-19.

With Colder Weather, Challenges to Slow Spread of COVID-19 Will Grow

Oct 23, 2020
Natalie Krebs/Iowa Public Radio

Whitney Selix said so far, Lua Brewery in Des Moines, which she started with her husband a year ago, is surviving the pandemic.

Local Commentary: Reclaiming 2020

Oct 21, 2020
Courtesy photo

A few weeks ago, I stood onstage in Macomb High School's Fellheimer Auditorium for the first time since the storm of cancellations last spring. Walking centerstage, I realized exactly how much I missed theater and my community. I even missed the audition nerves that sit in my throat and shake my hands. I worried that something would feel hollow having to project through a mask and maintain social distance with the other actors, but it didn't. Instead, it felt like normal, and we all know normal is excellent in a pandemic.

A coronavirus outbreak has been reported at a long-term care facility in Macomb; and an independent, nonprofit newsroom found the number of COVID-19 cases at a Monmouth meatpacking plant is much higher than previously announced.

Bonnie Seifried used to sit outside her husband’s window every day.

The nursing home where Frank Seifried lived, the Woodlands of Arnold, stopped allowing in-person visits in March — so every morning, she set up a folding chair and a polka dot umbrella under a tree outside.

Seifried sat with her husband for hours, separated by a thick layer of glass, writing out messages to him on a little whiteboard and sharing updates about their kids and grandkids.

Sometimes, she noticed, the staff wouldn’t check on him for hours at a time.