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Barack Obama

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It was only a matter a time before recent events caused someone to focus in on Illinois State Capitol statues dedicated to those with racist pasts.  Now, House Speaker Michael Madigan is calling for the removal of two statues sitting outside the State Capitol and a portrait inside the chamber of the Illinois House.

In his first major political speech since leaving office, former President Barack Obama took aim at the Trump administration and Republicans in Congress — blaming them for inciting division and stoking fears in the country.

Obama delivered the address at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus, where he also accepted the Paul H. Douglas Award for Ethics in Government from the Institute of Government and Public Affairs.

A would-be state holiday passed last week without notice in Illinois. But supporters are hoping it will be recognized in the future.

Beyonce, George Lucas, and Magic Johnson were among the stars on the guest list for President Barack Obama's White House 55th birthday party (Obama's former chief of staff, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, scored an invite too).

On a freezing February day in 2007, President Barack Obama announced his bid for the nation's highest office in front of the Old State Capitol in downtown Springfield -- the place where Abraham Lincoln gave his historic "House Divided" speech. At the time, Obama called for hope and change.

Nine years later -- to the very day -- Obama came back to Springfield. In his last year as president, he says he believes in the "politics of hope."

President Barack Obama addressed a joint session of the Illinois General Assembly Wednesday. As expected, he talked about improving American politics. What follows is Illinois Public Radio's broadcast of the full speech, hosted by Niala Boodhoo with reporting and analysis from IPR's Amanda Vinicky and Brian Mackeyand former state Sen. Rick Winkel, who's with the University of Illinois' Institute of Government and Public Affairs. There's also video of the speech and a transcript provided by the White House press office.

President Barack Obama is set to address the Illinois General Assembly in Springfield Wednesday. Statehouse reporter Brian Mackey filed this preview of what the president is expected to say — and what he probably won’t say.

Lawmakers Consider Giving Obama A State Holiday

Feb 9, 2016

As the president prepares to visit the state capitol and speak to lawmakers, some in Illinois are wanting to designate a holiday in his honor.

Rich Egger

A couple community college presidents in western Illinois are generally supportive of a proposal from the White House.

Remembering Lane Evans

Nov 10, 2014
Friends of Lane Evans

Family, friends, and former colleagues and co-workers said goodbye Monday to Lane Evans.

Years in the Making, New Farm Bill Becomes Law

Feb 7, 2014
Courtesy Stephen Carmody/Michigan Radio

President Barack Obama signed the new farm bill into law Friday at Michigan State University in East Lansing, ending years of negotiations and wrangling.

Galesburg Chamber Survey Ahead of Presidential Visit

Jul 22, 2013

The Galesburg Area Chamber of Commerce is reaching out to area businesses ahead of  President Obama’s visit to Knox College on Wednesday.

In The Tri States

Dec 1, 2012

A look back at the top stories and features from the Tri States Public Radio news department from November 2012.  

This week on Campaign Trails, Political Science Professor Vin Auger of Western Illinois University talked about this week’s foreign policy debate between Democratic President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

Auger said there was very little difference between the two on many of the issues that were brought up. He said Romney agreed with the president’s policies regarding drone strikes, the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan, and more.

Auger was surprised to hear so much consensus.

Rich Egger

This week on Campaign Trails, Janna Deitz and Keith Boeckelman talk about the differences between campaigning for president and governing as president.

Boeckelman is Chair of the Western Illinois University Political Science Department. Deitz teaches in the department, and she spent much of the past year in Washington DC participating in the American Political Science Association’s Congressional Fellowship Program. As part of the program, Deitz served in office of US Senator Dick Durbin (D-IL), giving her a first-hand look at how Congress works.

Rich Egger

This week on Campaign Trails, panelists Tom Sadler and Bill Polley examine the economic policies of President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

Sadler and Polley both teach in the Department of Economics and Decision Sciences at Western Illinois University. Both have studied the candidates’ policies closely and, in fact, Sadler spoke on behalf of President Obama and Polley spoke on behalf of Governor Romney during a mock debate at WIU on October 9.

Ryan Campaigns in Burlington

Oct 2, 2012

The presidential campaign made its way to southeast Iowa for the second time in the last month.

Although the Occupy Wall Street movement is not involved in conventional campaigning, a political expert says it could have a dramatic effect on a second Obama administration.

Keith Boeckelman is chair of the political science department at Western Illinois University.

He says the president had to toe a moderate line after Republicans took control of the House of  Representatives and the Tea Party movement played a major part in House politics.