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Rich Egger

New home and new name for arts center in Galesburg

The Galesburg Civic Art Center is now known as the Galesburg Community Arts Center, and it has moved a few blocks down East Main Street to the corner of Main and Seminary.

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Commentary: A Glimmer of Light

Oct 13, 2021
Courtesy of Beth Howard

A stray dog showed up on our farm a few weeks ago. At first, he only came around at night, lurking in the shadows as we sat around the fire pit after supper. He was tri-colored and as tall and lanky as a colt. I did an internet search and discovered he was a Walker Coonhound. He was young and puppy-like, probably about a year old, and judging by his aversion to being touched, he had likely been living on his own for a long time. Was he lost? Or was he dumped in a field by some heartless person who couldn't be bothered with him?

A journalist in the Philippines and a reporter in Russia have won the Nobel Peace Prize this year.

The Origins of College Mascots and Nicknames

Oct 11, 2021

Chris Pio says his fascination started while he was coaching track and cross country at Monmouth College, and working as the sports information director in the 1980's and 90's. But the actual serious research and writing didn't happen until 2017 when he was recovering from an injury.

Rural Utilities Feel Growing Pains as Marijuana Industry Booms

Oct 11, 2021
Seth Bodine/Harvest Public Media

The medical marijuana industry in Oklahoma is booming, but some utility providers struggle to keep up with the growing need for water and electricity.

Rich Egger

The Spoon River College Board of Trustees agreed to move ahead with the complete buildout of the school's campus on Macomb's east side.

The Carl Sandburg College Board of Trustees agreed to authorize a $30 million bond issue. The money will pay for improvements to the campus in Galesburg.

The messages that worked to persuade unvaccinated people to roll up their sleeves this spring may not work anymore. That's according to new survey research, which also finds some pro-vaccine messages can backfire and lead to greater hesitancy.

Plaintiffs: New legislative maps in Illinois dilute Latino vote

Oct 7, 2021

Plaintiffs in two lawsuits challenging the state's legislative redistricting plan have filed new complaints in federal court charging that the district maps that lawmakers approved in August dilute Latino voting power and thus violate the U.S. Constitution and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Courtesy of University of Northern Iowa

Students in Steve O'Kane's plant systematics class at the University of Northern Iowa penned a letter of support for him Tuesday, defending his actions to "protect the health and safety of students in his classroom."

Natalie Krebs/Iowa Public Radio News

The Meskwaki Nation's Tribal Health Center is getting national recognition for its wide-reaching COVID-19 vaccination efforts.

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Jeff Holtz Recording Scholarship kick-off Concert

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Harvest Public Media

Rural Utilities Feel Growing Pains as Marijuana Industry Booms

Oct 11, 2021
Seth Bodine/Harvest Public Media

The medical marijuana industry in Oklahoma is booming, but some utility providers struggle to keep up with the growing need for water and electricity.

Seth Bodine/Harvest Public Media

The U.S. Department of Agriculture wants farmers to do more to offset climate change. But more than half of the farmers who want to cash in on the payments that come with two programs have been shut out.

More power lines could move underground as part of an effort included in the infrastructure bill to update the nation’s energy system, but rural energy providers still worry about the cost of installation and maintenance.

The $1 trillion infrastructure bill, which passed the Senate in August, includes $73 billion to modernize the electric grid. U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm says moving power lines underground, a practice called “undergrounding,” may be part of that effort.

Jimmy Emmons has all sorts of things growing in his fields in Leedey, Oklahoma. There’s peas, beans, millets and varieties of grain sorghum, but none of it is for harvest. 

He’s growing what’s known as cover crops — plants meant to cover the ground and preserve it. Over the past seven years, he says he’s watched the difference in the soil. He’s often carrying a shovel on his fields, looking and even smelling the dirt.

“Smells real earthy and sweet,” Emmons says. 

A pig’s ideal temperature is 65 degrees Fahrenheit. 

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