background_fid.jpg
Macomb 91.3fm - Galesburg 90.7fm Keokuk 89.5fm - Burlington 106.3fm
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations

Advocates Say Push For 'Pets In Hot Cars' Legislation Continues

Illinois lawmakers were unable to agree this spring on a plan to protect good Samaritans who rescue an animal left inside a hot car. Advocates say the push will continue.
Charlie
/
Flickr- CC BY-SA 2.0
Illinois lawmakers were unable to agree this spring on a plan to protect good Samaritans who rescue an animal left inside a hot car. Advocates say the push will continue.

Illinois lawmakers were unable to agree this spring on a plan to protect good Samaritans who rescue an animal left inside a hot car. Advocates say the push will continue. Listen to the story.

The Illinois House approved the effort, but opponents countered a rescue attempt should be left to the experts in animal control… to avoid a run-away animal or an attack.

Marc Ayers— who is the Illinois state director for the Humane Society of the United States, said such scenarios are hypothetical and very rare in states with similar laws.  “We are not seeing dogs fighting rescuers, we’re not seeing dogs getting away from the rescuer going into traffic, or getting hit by a car," he said. 

Under the legislation, someone would be exempted from criminal and civil liabilities, as long as the police are called and the cat or dog is safely handed over to them. Ayers says it’s already against the law in the state to endanger an animal in extreme temperatures.

The measure gives a passerby the power to act, such as breaking into a car, while waiting for authorities to arrive -- and according to Ayers, 13 other states, most recently Louisiana, already have similar legislation.  

Copyright 2018 NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Daisy reports on various assignments for NPR Illinois. She graduated from the Public Affairs Reporting master’s degree program at the University of Illinois Springfield, where she spent time covering the legislative session for NPR Illinois' Illinois Issues. Daisy interned then researched for the Chicago Reporter. She obtained an associate degree in French language from Harry S Truman College and a bachelor's degree in communications from the Illinois Institute of Technology. Before coming to Springfield, Daisy worked in communication roles for several Chicago non-profits. Daisy is from Chicago where she attended Lane Tech High School.
Daisy Contreras
Daisy reports on statehouse issues for our Illinois Issues project. She's currently a Public Affairs Reporting graduate program student at the University of Illinois Springfield. She graduated from the Illinois Institute of Technology with an associates degrees from Truman College. Daisy is from Chicago where she attended Lane Tech High School.