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immigration

ANDREA TUDHOPE / AMERICA AMPLIFIED: ELECTION 2020

On a Monday night, a week before the Iowa caucuses, about 20 residents gathered at the Norelius library in Denison, Iowa, for a mock caucus. Latina activist Alma Puga, the organizer, called the caucuses the "Disneyland of politics."

Brian Mackey / NPR Illinois

A panel of lawmakers this week grilled Secretary of State Jesse White and officials from the Illinois State Board of Elections over problems with the state's automatic voter registration system.

Commentary: The Dream of the Parents

Sep 25, 2019
Rich Egger

I have been interviewing undocumented immigrant youth, the so-called DREAMers, for over a year. I have spoken with young persons who want to become lawyers, doctors, engineers, and professors. Even though I have tried to reach out to other youth who are not on the college track (45% of DREAMers), it has been challenging to find them. Who wants to be open about their immigration status in our country today?

Unlike other rural towns in central Illinois, officials in Beardstown say their population is growing. And they want to make sure everyone is counted in the 2020 census. 

For this week’s Illinois Issues, we look at the challenges to an accurate count and what’s at risk if not everyone participates.

Rich Egger

"Lights for Liberty" vigils were held around the world on July 12.  Demonstrators called for an end to the human detention camps used by the United States along its border with Mexico.

Pritzker Tells Journalists 'We Need You'

Apr 15, 2019

Governor J.B. Pritzker held his largest press conference over the weekend  and he’s promising media transparency under his administration.

Like many of the refugees who have resettled in Greeley, Colorado, 35-year-old Abul Basar is employed by JBS.

It’s a massive meatpacking plant that processes thousands of cattle per day and employs over 3,000 people. After a year of working on the plant’s processing line, where he disembowel cow carcasses with a large electric knife, Basar injured his right hand.

Illinois Senator Dick Durbin was in Springfield today (WED), casting his ballot in the 2018 Election. He says he's encouraged by early voting tallies in Illinois so far, and that immigration is now among the chief issues thanks to President Trump.


Esperanza Yanez can spot a sick cow just by looking at it.

“The head hangs down and they don’t eat,” said Yanez, who immigrated from Mexico two decades ago and has been caring for cattle ever since.

Rich Egger

Many so-called Dreamers – people who were brought to the United States illegally as children -- have spent most of their lives in the U.S.  They've grown up, attended school, and held jobs here.  Some have even started families of their own.

Julia Albarracin

On September 10, I attended a rally in Springfield in support of the beneficiaries of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  The day before, I made three signs for the rally that read: "Defend DACA," "Dreamers, not Criminals," and "Dreamers are Here to Stay."

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

At the public library in the rural Morgan County town of Brush, Colorado, Marissa Velazquez welcomes her students to class. It's a sunny Saturday morning, and today marks the halfway point in Velazquez's class, a ten-week crash course on American history, civics and English.

Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

This story is part of the special series United And Divided, which explores the links and rifts between rural and urban America.

The bell signals the start of second period. A trio of young women take seats in English class, their attention quickly drifting outside the walls of the high school in Fort Morgan, Colorado, eager to talk about what they're working toward.

Poncie Rutsch for Harvest Public Media

Fort Morgan is a town of about 11,000 people tucked into the farmland of northeastern Colorado. Among its residents are people of Latino and European ancestry, and more recent immigrants, including refugees from eastern Africa.

Chelsea Castillo Macek

A new photo exhibit strives to demonstrate the great diversity in Galesburg's immigrant population.

Poncie Rutsch/KUNC

Many of the more than 3 million migrant farmworkers that plant and pick the fruits and vegetables we eat in the U.S. live on the farms they work for. But the rules that govern farmworker housing might be changing, worrying both farmers and migrant worker advocates.

Wiki Commons

Immigration status alone will no longer be a valid reason for the Illinois State Police to detain someone, under an order issued by Governor Pat Quinn.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

In a dimly-lit lab on the Des Moines, Iowa, public schools’ agricultural science campus, students in aprons, safety goggles and plastic gloves poke and probe chicken wings.

Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media

Bear Creek Dairy in Brooklyn, Iowa, is home to more than 1,100 cows, who provide about 100,000 pounds of milk each day.  The 15-year-old farmer who works closely with the farm’s calves comes from a long line of dairymen – in Europe.

Peggy Lowe/Harvest Public Media

Immigrants have always been the backbone of America’s meat packing plants, offering upward mobility for its newcomers.